Posts filed under ‘Other’

Peppermint Linux OS

I fell over a GNU/Linux distribution called Peppermint today, when I was searching after something Linux Mint 9 LXDE (Me and Joliclound 1.0 didn’t work out that well). I haven’t tried Peppermint yet but when I read on their webpage it seems really interesting:

System Requirements:
* i386 or derivative processor (AMD64 and x86_64 are fine as well)
* 192 MB of RAM
* 4 GB hard drive space (this is an overestimate just for good measure)

Under the Hood:
* Pcmanfm 0.9.7
* Openbox 3.4.11.2
* Xorg 1.7.6
* Lxsession 0.4.3

Peppermint is based on Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx or to be more specific Lubuntu, but it seems like they have used something from Linux Mint as well, and the default desktop environment is LXDE. It’s focusing on cloud computing and wants everything to work out of the box. It comes in two flavours: One and Ice. The only main difference seems to be that One relies on Firefox and Mozilla Prism while Ice uses Chromium as it’s default browser and uses a custom Ice tool to link to cloud applications on the desktop.

Default Installed Applications One: Firefox, Drop-Box, Exaile, Prism, X-Chat and Transmission

Default Installed Applications: Chromium Web Browser, Drop-Box, Xnoise, Ice, X-Chat and Transmission

You can find more information on their webpage: Peppermint Linux

Think I will try it on Vesla (Asus Eee 900) soon, and maybe write you a little review?

A little screenshot from their webpage:

22/08/2010 at 18:51 1 comment

First Look: Jolicloud 1.0

Linux Mint 9 got a little to heavy for my little netbook, Vesla (Asus Eee 900), so right now I’m testing Jolicloud 1.0.

I’ve tested the previous version before, and wasn’t really impressed; it looked like Ubuntu Netbook Edition just with another software installer, and if I had to choose between the two then I would go for UNE.

But when I installed Joulicloud 1.0 it was really different, it no longer looks like a UNE clone, and this screenshot speaks for itself:

From Wikipedia:

Version 1.0 of the operating system incorporates a user interface built with HTML5 that includes an application launcher, a library of compatible applications with one-click installation and removal, a display of all machines associated with user account, and a social activity stream that enables users to compare installed applications. The launcher displays only those applications supported on the library, but that launcher can be viewed from any machine running Jolicloud. Account management is available from any computer with an HTML5-compatible browser.

The installation went nicely, but for some reason Jolicloud really wanted to unmount my hard drive. I also had some trouble with “activating” my netbook on wifi and I had to use a my Ethernet cable to be able to see a drop-down menu that I needed to get it to work (Bad Jolicloud!)… Besides that everything seems to work out of the box on my Asus Eee 900. I’ve also tested it on the Aspire One 751h of a  friend of mine, and it worked out of the box there as well, even though it usually doesn’t play well with GNU/Linux distros. So I have to say that I’m actually really impressed with Jolicloud’s list over compatible devices ^^

When it comes to software I’m missing lot of packages like for example Okular (had to force Jolicloud into accepting in the terminal) and Exaile. It’s also based on Ubuntu 9.10 which means that it won’t Jolicloud wont packages from newer Ubuntu versions like for example Spotify for Linux.

But overall I like it (even if I want more programs and more possibilities for customisation) and since it passed my Dropbox-and-Okular-test, I’m going to try it for some days. So don’t be surprised if you see some Jolicloud updates here in the next few days (for example about how to install Okular in Jolicloud 1.0 :P).

07/08/2010 at 23:11 Leave a comment

Finally: Spotify for Linux!

Yes, you read it right! Right now Spotify is working on a version for Linux users, so hopefully we soon don’t have to rely on Wine to run Spotify any more. And hopefully this will fix the Spotify link issues as well as other functionality that we haven’t been able to use until now ^^

Right now the GNU/Linux Spotify version is in a preview version that’s just available for Spotify Premium subscribers as they “haven’t found a reliable way to display ads yet“.  Users should also note “that there are issues regarding decoding of local music on the Linux platform so we haven’t included support for local files in this version“. It also seems like they are focusing on Debian distributions right now(?).

Why has finally Spotify acknowledged us Linux users? I accentually think this is something we should hank the developers of programs like DEspotify for :)

Installation

  1. Go to Software Sources (Ubuntu: System > Administration > Software Sources)
  2. Then select the Third-Party Software tab
  3. Click on the [+ Add] button and add: deb http://repository.spotify.com stable non-free (be sure to reload/update your sources)
  4. Open the Terminal and write:
    gpg --keyserver wwwkeys.de.pgp.net --recv-keys 4E9CFF4E
  5. gpg --export 4E9CFF4E |sudo apt-key add -
  6. sudo apt-get install spotify-client-qt spotify-client-gnome-support
  7. And yey it’s installed!

As I’m not a premium user myself it would be really cool if people could tell if this installation worked for them, and about the look and feel about the preview version of Spotify for Linux :)

Read more: Spotify for Linux

UPDATE: Spotify for Linux is now also available for Spotify Unlimited subscribers.

12/07/2010 at 13:01 2 comments

When Linux Hangs or Completely Freezes

When Windows hangs itself we all know what to do right? Were just reaching for the combination [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del] (Control Alt Delete). But if you try this in Linux nothing happens (in some distributions, like Ubuntu, you actually get the menu for shutting down your system, but this don’t work when your system hags or freezes).

So what to do?

There is 3 keyboard combinations every Linux user should remember (or write down). But before we begin I want you to understand some of the signs I use: If a symbol is surrounded by [ ] means that it is a button or key on your keyboard. + means that you have to hold the keys down at once. And > means that you have to click the buttons one by one, remember that you have to press each key for 2-3 seconds. Now that you have learned this we can move on to the commands:

Fist you have the combination [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace] (backspace is the [←] over [Enter]) that restarts X or GDM (you will be logged out), and you can kind of call it Linux’s Control Alt Delete equivalent. This command gives your programs time to make emergency backups of unsaved files (for example if you writing on a document in Open Office) and it  prevents that you get a file system error during the crash.If you use Ubuntu or a distribution based on Ubuntu you will have to use [Alt]+[PrtSc]+[K] (PrtSc = Print Screen) instead, but you should note that some Ubuntu based distros (like Linux Mint) still use the universal [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace]. (Note 14.11.2013: For newer versions of Ubuntu, and some of it’s derivatives, even this combination does not seemto work any more, to get it working again check out the update in the end of the post)

But what to do if this combination doesn’t work? Then you have to use something called Magic SysRq Keys. In short they are keys which allows you to perform various commands regardless of the system’s state, like in this case get the system to recover from a freeze. Note that these keys wont work if your system is in kernel panic. Like I said there are tree combinations that you will have to remember and since we have already learned one, there are two to go:

This command will get your freezed system to restart safely:
Hold [Alt]+[PrtSc] then type [R]>[S]>[E]>[I]>[U]>[B] (press each key for 2-3 seconds). In short the keys mean: unRaw (take control of keyboard back from X), tErminate (send SIGTERM to all processes, allowing them to terminate gracefully), kIll (send SIGKILL to all processes, forcing them to terminate immediately), Sync (flush data to disk), Unmount (remount all filesystems read-only), reBoot (restart).

This command will get your freezed system to shut down in a safe way:
Again hold [Alt]+[PrtSc] then type [R]>[S]>[E]>[I]>[U]>[O] (press each key for 2-3 seconds). These keys mean: unRaw, tErminate, kIll, Sync, Unmount , shutdOwn (does it really need an explanation?).

To learn more about Magic SysRq Keys visit: Wikipedia: Magic SysRq Key.

 


 

Update:

As Andy E points out in his comment; [Alt]+[PrtSc]+[K] does not seem to work in newer versions of Ubuntu and some of it’s derivatives.

To get it working again first type this into the terminal (if you prefer using a dedicated text manager and not the terminal, change nano into your preferred text editor, like for example gedit):
sudo nano /etc/sysctl.d/10-magic-sysrq.conf

You will now see this line of code in the end of the file:
kernel.sysrq = 176

Change this into:
kernel.sysrq = 180

Then save and reboot, and [Alt]+[PrtSc]+[K] will “magically” work again!

04/06/2010 at 14:55 7 comments

How to get hardware information in Linux?

This guide requires use of the Terminal, and can be used on all Linux systems (as far as I know).

The package were going to use is named Hardware Lister (command: lshw).

Most Linux systems and distros comes with this pre-installed as default, but if you should need to install it you just write this in your Terminal:

APT (Debian, Ubuntu…): sudo apt-get install lshw

Yum (Fedora, Red Hat…): sudo yum install lshw

If your system doesn’t use APT or Yum (and doesn’t have lshw pre-installed), you can visit this site for installation instructions: Hardware Lister (lshw).

But as I said most systems comes pre-installed with this package as default, so you doesn’t have to use the commands mentioned over unless this command doesn’t work:

sudo lshw

If you got lot’s of text about your system you have it installed. Yey! But if you get the message bash: lshw: command not found you will have to install it.

This single command gives you all the information you will need about your hardware. But what if you just want some part of this information? No problem, just use these commands:

  • Short summary of all the important information: sudo lshw -short
  • Information about your system (like manufacturer, serial-number, type etc. ) : sudo lshw -class system
  • For memory (RAM, BIOS, firmware etc. ) information type:
    sudo lshw -class memory
  • CPU info: sudo lshw -class cpu
  • Information about your disk(s) sudo lshw -class disk
  • Network information: sudo lshw -class network
  • Disk volum information sudo lshw -class volume
  • Example of how you can combine these commands: sudo lshw -class system -class memory -class cpu

Like you maybe has understood by now, the information in ishw is stored in classes (therefore the -class). So this is just some examples, and if you want the whole list of classes you can visit Hardware Lister’s homepage (or just use sudo lshw and try to memorise the classes by yourself)

But what if you want to store this information in a file, so you dosn’t have to do the lshw information everytime your wondering about some of your hardware info? That’s no problem either :)

  • Store the information as a .txt file: sudo lshw > hardware-info.txt
  • Store it as a HTML file: sudo lshw -html > hardware-info.html
  • And finally as a XML file: sudo lshw -xml > hardware-info.xml

Note that all these commands will save the files in your home folder, and that the commands of course can be combined with the ones mentioned over for you specific needs (but if your not really into using the terminal yet I would stay with the ones I have mentioned here for now).

If your kind of scared of using the Terminal there’s a option for you too: Just go to Synaptic and do a little search for lshw-gtk (gtk-lshw in some distributions) and install it. You can also install it by typing this command in the Terminal sudo apt-get install lshw-gtk (ATP).

02/06/2010 at 20:01 Leave a comment


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