Posts tagged ‘GUI’

First Look: Jolicloud 1.0

Linux Mint 9 got a little to heavy for my little netbook, Vesla (Asus Eee 900), so right now I’m testing Jolicloud 1.0.

I’ve tested the previous version before, and wasn’t really impressed; it looked like Ubuntu Netbook Edition just with another software installer, and if I had to choose between the two then I would go for UNE.

But when I installed Joulicloud 1.0 it was really different, it no longer looks like a UNE clone, and this screenshot speaks for itself:

From Wikipedia:

Version 1.0 of the operating system incorporates a user interface built with HTML5 that includes an application launcher, a library of compatible applications with one-click installation and removal, a display of all machines associated with user account, and a social activity stream that enables users to compare installed applications. The launcher displays only those applications supported on the library, but that launcher can be viewed from any machine running Jolicloud. Account management is available from any computer with an HTML5-compatible browser.

The installation went nicely, but for some reason Jolicloud really wanted to unmount my hard drive. I also had some trouble with “activating” my netbook on wifi and I had to use a my Ethernet cable to be able to see a drop-down menu that I needed to get it to work (Bad Jolicloud!)… Besides that everything seems to work out of the box on my Asus Eee 900. I’ve also tested it on the Aspire One 751h of a  friend of mine, and it worked out of the box there as well, even though it usually doesn’t play well with GNU/Linux distros. So I have to say that I’m actually really impressed with Jolicloud’s list over compatible devices ^^

When it comes to software I’m missing lot of packages like for example Okular (had to force Jolicloud into accepting in the terminal) and Exaile. It’s also based on Ubuntu 9.10 which means that it won’t Jolicloud wont packages from newer Ubuntu versions like for example Spotify for Linux.

But overall I like it (even if I want more programs and more possibilities for customisation) and since it passed my Dropbox-and-Okular-test, I’m going to try it for some days. So don’t be surprised if you see some Jolicloud updates here in the next few days (for example about how to install Okular in Jolicloud 1.0 :P).

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07/08/2010 at 23:11 Leave a comment

How to watch encrypted DVDs in Ubuntu?

This is one of the questions people often ask me when they are trying Ubuntu for the first time. For in Ubuntu, unlike in Linux Mint (one reasons why I recommend Linux Mint for those who new to GNU/Linux), watching encrypted DVDs doesn’t work right out of the box. This is because this feature is a part of the package repository Medibuntu (Multimedia, Entertainment & Distractions In Ubuntu) that isn’t included into the Ubuntu distribution for legal reasons (copyright, license, patent, etc).

I’m just going into show you how to install the package that let you play encrypted DVDs and not how to add the Medibuntu repository (but if you want to you cant read about how to do that here: Medibuntu.

The GUI Way

  1. Open Synaptic (System >Administration > Synaptic Package Manager ) or Ubuntu Software Centre if you’re using Ubuntu 10.04 (Applications -> Ubuntu Software Centre)
  2. Search for ubuntu-restricted-extras (Ubuntu users), kubuntu-restricted-extras (Kubuntu users) or xubuntu-restricted-extras (Xubuntu users) and install this package
  3. Then search for the package named libdvdcss2 and install it
  4. You should now be able to watch encrypted DVDs on your system :) If you didn’t find libdvdcss2 try the Terminal Way’s step

The Terminal Way:

  1. Open the Terminal:
    Ubuntu: Applications > Accessories > Terminal
    Kubuntu: KMenu > System > Terminal Program (Konsole)
    Xubuntu: Applications menu -> System -> Terminal
  2. Install Ubuntu Restricted Extras with this command:
    Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras
    Kubuntu: sudo apt-get install kubuntu-restricted-extras
    Xubuntu: sudo apt-get install xubuntu-restricted-extras
  3. Then install try to install libdvdcss2 with the command sudo apt-get install libdvdcss2 if it didn’t work try the command below that’s matching your system (if you don’t know which one, try the one for i386).
    i386:

    1. wget -c http://packages.medibuntu.org/pool/free/libd/libdvdcss/libdvdcss2_1.2.9-2medibuntu4_i386.deb
    2. sudo dpkg -i libdvdcss2_1.2.9-2medibuntu4_i386.deb

    amd64:

    1. wget -c http://packages.medibuntu.org/pool/free/libd/libdvdcss/libdvdcss2_1.2.9-2medibuntu4_amd64.deb
    2. sudo dpkg -i libdvdcss2_1.2.9-2medibuntu4_amd64.deb

    PowerPC:

    1. wget -c http://packages.medibuntu.org/pool/free/libd/libdvdcss/libdvdcss2_1.2.9-2medibuntu2_powerpc.deb
    2. sudo dpkg -i libdvdcss2_1.2.9-2medibuntu2_powerpc.deb
  4. And there! You should now be able to watch encrypted DVDs!

And in case someone is wondering: I recommend using VLC for watching DVDs in Ubuntu (you can find it in Synaptic and Ubuntu Software Centre or you can just install it by using this command: sudo apt-get install vlc).

16/06/2010 at 21:24 4 comments

How to re-enable Ctrl+Alt+BackSpace in Ubuntu

In my last post I wrote about what to do when when Linux hangs or completely freezes. In the same post I mentioned that the key command [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace] was switched to [Alt]+[PrtSc]+[K] in Ubuntu. This is was done because of the fact that DontZap is no longer an option in the X server and has become an option in XKB instead. This guide is meant for old Ubuntu users and those that have migrated to Ubuntu from other Linux distros.

Before we begin you should note that all these methods will re-enable the [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace] key command, but not disable the new [Alt]+[PrtSc]+[K].

These methods should work for Ubuntu 9.10 and 10.04 (and hopefully for the future versions of Ubuntu).

The Easy GUI Way

GNOME

  1. First go to: System > Preferences >Keyboard menu
  2. Then select the Layouts tab and click on the Layout Options button
  3. Then find and select Key sequence to kill the X server and then select Control + Alt + Backspace
  4. And yey! You can now use [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace] to kill the X server!

KDE

  1. Open System Settings
  2. Select  Regional & Language
  3. Then select Keyboard Layout
  4. Click on Enable keyboard layouts (in the Layout tab).
  5. Select the Advanced tab
  6. Then find and select Key sequence to kill the X server and then select Control + Alt + Backspace
  7. And now you too should be able to kill the X server with [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace] :D

The Terminal Way

Requires installation of a program

  1. Install the “dontzap” package:
    sudo apt-get install dontzap
  2. Type to enable [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace]:
    sudo dontzap --disable
  3. And type this if you find out that you want to disable it later:
    sudo dontzap --enable

Does not require an installation (but it is kind of scary)

  1. Open the terminal and type:
    sudo gksudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf
  2. Then add these lines to your xorg.conf file, and then save.
    Section "ServerFlags"
    Option "DontZap" "false"
    EndSection
  3. Then log out (and then in again) from your account (or restart) to enable the changes

Do you know other methods to re-enable [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[BackSpace]? Please tell in a comment ^^

09/06/2010 at 19:37 Leave a comment

How to get hardware information in Linux?

This guide requires use of the Terminal, and can be used on all Linux systems (as far as I know).

The package were going to use is named Hardware Lister (command: lshw).

Most Linux systems and distros comes with this pre-installed as default, but if you should need to install it you just write this in your Terminal:

APT (Debian, Ubuntu…): sudo apt-get install lshw

Yum (Fedora, Red Hat…): sudo yum install lshw

If your system doesn’t use APT or Yum (and doesn’t have lshw pre-installed), you can visit this site for installation instructions: Hardware Lister (lshw).

But as I said most systems comes pre-installed with this package as default, so you doesn’t have to use the commands mentioned over unless this command doesn’t work:

sudo lshw

If you got lot’s of text about your system you have it installed. Yey! But if you get the message bash: lshw: command not found you will have to install it.

This single command gives you all the information you will need about your hardware. But what if you just want some part of this information? No problem, just use these commands:

  • Short summary of all the important information: sudo lshw -short
  • Information about your system (like manufacturer, serial-number, type etc. ) : sudo lshw -class system
  • For memory (RAM, BIOS, firmware etc. ) information type:
    sudo lshw -class memory
  • CPU info: sudo lshw -class cpu
  • Information about your disk(s) sudo lshw -class disk
  • Network information: sudo lshw -class network
  • Disk volum information sudo lshw -class volume
  • Example of how you can combine these commands: sudo lshw -class system -class memory -class cpu

Like you maybe has understood by now, the information in ishw is stored in classes (therefore the -class). So this is just some examples, and if you want the whole list of classes you can visit Hardware Lister’s homepage (or just use sudo lshw and try to memorise the classes by yourself)

But what if you want to store this information in a file, so you dosn’t have to do the lshw information everytime your wondering about some of your hardware info? That’s no problem either :)

  • Store the information as a .txt file: sudo lshw > hardware-info.txt
  • Store it as a HTML file: sudo lshw -html > hardware-info.html
  • And finally as a XML file: sudo lshw -xml > hardware-info.xml

Note that all these commands will save the files in your home folder, and that the commands of course can be combined with the ones mentioned over for you specific needs (but if your not really into using the terminal yet I would stay with the ones I have mentioned here for now).

If your kind of scared of using the Terminal there’s a option for you too: Just go to Synaptic and do a little search for lshw-gtk (gtk-lshw in some distributions) and install it. You can also install it by typing this command in the Terminal sudo apt-get install lshw-gtk (ATP).

02/06/2010 at 20:01 Leave a comment

How to make desktop shortcuts to Java programs in Ubuntu

My first problem when I changed from Windows XP to Ubuntu was: How do I get CGoban (Java Program) to work in Ubuntu? And how do I get it to launch from my desktop?

  1. Download CGoban from KGS, and choose to save it [link]
    (I will recommend you to save it in your home directory so it’s easier to find)
  2. Open it Java Web Start (right click and choose) to check that the file works
  3. Go to your desktop and right click choose the option from the menu that makes you create a short cut.
  4. Write in your preferences (NOTE: You have to choose the option that makes it open your file as a “location”)

To make CGoban appear in you menu just do the same in you menu editor (right click at he Ubuntu icon on the start menu)

If you want to make a customised icon for CGoban it’s really easy just click on the icon in Preferences and choose the icon you like (you can even choose a picture).

My icon is actually Bergen Goklubb’s logo (which I designed by the way) ^^

CGoban running like a charm in Ubuntu 9.04:

11/05/2009 at 10:05 Leave a comment


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